RetroTech : Apple Software Binder & Mac Picasso Glass

March 03, 2011
Alfred is at it again! Our friend Alfred DiBlasi has posted this new video on YouTube of some interesting vintage Apple items!.
His intro:
"On the launch of the iPad 2, I thought it would be fun to take a look back at a few legacy items in my personal collection."



RetroTech : Apple Software Binder & Mac Picasso Glass

Bringing an Apple Lisa Online

December 10, 2010
A cool new article at "Monkeywrench" (www.wheels.org/monkeywrench)

It begins:
"The Apple Lisa operating system does not include a network stack, so there is no way to bring one online in the normal sense (it might be possible under Lisa Xenix, but I don’t have a copy to work with, and the lack of a graphical user interface means it probably wouldn’t be much fun anyway). However, all versions of the Lisa come with a serial port, the Lisa 7/7 operating system includes telecommunications software, and Mac OSX can act as a server, intermediating between the Lisa and the web."



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Bringing an Apple Lisa Online

Cult of Mac Exclusive: Surprise! Apple I Buyer is a “PC”

October 28, 2009
A new article at Cult of Mac by Nicole Martinelli.
It begins:
"On October 3, a collector bought a rare Apple 1 on eBay for $18,000. The computer, one of about 50 thought to be still in existence, had an estimated value of $14,000 – $16,000.
Back in July 1976, the Apple I sold for $666.66; there were 200 of them hand made by Steve Wozniak. Sold in a kit, it came with 4KB standard memory, you could bump up to 8KB or 48KB with expansion cards. You had to add your own case, keyboard and display. (If you’d like to see one, check out the Smithsonian.)
The seller of this Apple 1, Monroe Postman, wasn’t even sure if it would still work.
So, who would pay $18,000 for an Apple I?"

Read More: Cult of Mac Exclusive: Surprise! Apple I Buyer is a “PC”

Apple Already Had a Netbook

May 20, 2009
A new article by Thomas Fitzgerald about the cutest of Apple products from days gone by - the eMate!
It begins:
"With all the talk lately about netbooks, and more importantly with everyone in the industry saying that Apple needs to sell a netbook, people often forget that before the category even existed, way back in 1997 Apple had a product that was remarkably similar to what people think of as a netbook today. That product was of course the eMate 300."



Read More: Apple Already Had a Netbook

Tech : NeXT Cube Demo

December 01, 2008
Our friend Alfred has just posted this cool demo of his NeXT Cube!
From his intro:
"In this video, with a run time of 53 minutes, I give a cursory overview of the hardware and operating system centric to the NeXT Computer.
When Steve Jobs was stripped of all managerial rights at Apple in 1985, he resigned and started NeXT.
In the mid 90's, when Apple was in dire straights for a modern, multitasking operating system, they looked to purchase Be for their BeOS. When that deal fell through, they negotiated with NeXT.
With the purchase, which was for about $500 million, not only did they get the NextStep/OpenStep OS, they also got back Steve Jobs.
The acquisition of NeXT, which was orchestrated by the current Apple CEO, Gil Amelio, saved the company from pending disaster.
So, join me for a some time-travel to 1990, where I will give you a peek at the roots of the modern Mac OS X operating system which many of us enjoy and use today."



Tech : NeXT Cube Demo

Gloom and Doom for the Newton MessagePad?

October 08, 2008
This is a semi-hidden page at the Walletware.com site on the "Future" of the MessagePad. It begins:
"Considering the recent announcements regarding the death of the Newton OS, we're concerned with the attitude of the 'Chicken Littles' assuming that Apple may be doing a 'bad' thing, assuming that the MessagePad itself has been killed.
Having been involved with the Newton industry as Newton software publishers and developers since 1993, we (WalletWare, Inc. and Balcones Software) feel compelled to attempt to shed some positive light on what Apple may be attempting to do in the handheld and palm PC industry. And if our guesses are correct, it's not all bad, folks!!"



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Gloom and Doom for the Newton MessagePad?

Larry's Original Review of the Macintosh

September 11, 2008
This review of the Original 128k Macintosh by Lawrence J. Magid from January 29, 1984 originally appeared in Los Angeles Times. An interesting read! It begins:
"I rarely get excited over a new computer. But Apple's Macintosh, officially introduced last Tuesday, has started a fever in Silicon Valley that's hard not to catch. My symptoms started when I talked with some devotees from Apple and the various companies that produce software, hardware and literature to enhance the new computer. By the time I got my hands on the little computer and its omni-present mouse, I was hooked. Apple has a winner.
The Mac, which retails for $2495 is about 14 inches tall and takes up about the same amount of desk space as a piece of 8 1/2 x 11 paper. It is smaller and lighter than most of the so called 'portable' machines. The entire system can be slipped into an optional ($99) padded carrying case to be hoisted over your shoulder or placed under an airline seat. The case and computer together weigh 22 pounds."

Read more:
Larry's Original Review of the Macintosh

Apple Lisa Redux - 24 Years Later

September 04, 2008
A new video from our friend Alfred! The intro:
"By the request of my YouTube subscribers and viewers, I return to the Apple Lisa system, 24 years after the cable television spot I did, to revisit the Lisa hardware and software."



Apple Lisa Redux - 24 Years Later

Apple's Pippin: A Pip--or A Pipsqueak?

July 14, 2008
Here is an article about the "Next Big Thing" from the archives at Business Week Magazine from 1996, written By Peter Burrows.
It begins:
"It lets a TV do a PC's work, but it may be too late
In his grim final days at Apple Computer Inc., former Chief Executive Michael H. Spindler took every opportunity to talk about Pippin, a technology that would be Apple's most aggressive move into consumer electronics. Based on a scaled-down version of the Macintosh operating system, Pippin would make possible gadgets to let the TV-viewing masses play Mac games and surf the Net from their couches."

Read more:
Apple's Pippin: A Pip--or A Pipsqueak?

The REAL 20th Anniversary Macintosh

June 30, 2008
A 2004 article by Tim Robertson at MyMac.com in which we compares the all-in-one iMac to the 1997 Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh!
From the article:
"In May of 1997, Apple Computer Inc. released a dream machine, the 20th Anniversary Macintosh. The name, however, was a bit of a misnomer. 1997 was not a celebration of twenty years of the Macintosh, but rather the twenty-year anniversary of Apple Computers. Apple was formed in 1977, and to celebrate, Apple released a machine with a machine with a $7,500 price tag. Ouch!"

Read More:
The REAL 20th Anniversary Macintosh

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